7 Steps To Build Muscle (For SKINNY GUYS)

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Learn how to build muscle fast. Even if you’re a skinny guy or hardgainer you can gain weight and bulk up if you just follow this diet and workout advice. The link to create you’re own bulking meal plan is below and by sticking to your macros you’ll gain healthy weight while building muscle mass.

🔥 FREE 6 Week Challenge: http://bit.ly/lose-fat327

Fat Loss Calculator: http://bit.ly/gt-calculator27

If you consider yourself a hardgainer and you find that no matter how hard you try, you just can’t pack on any more muscle you’re probably wondering, “what am I doing wrong here?” You’ve probably spent months, or maybe even years trying to bulk up but you’re still skinny, you don’t have much noticeable muscle mass, and most of your t shirts are still baggy, especially around your arms. Meanwhile you see other people that just seem to have an easier time than you. People that might not workout as much or they might eat the worst foods, yet they seem to be able to build muscle just by looking at a dumbbell. This can become really frustrating and even if you’re a persistant person that doesn’t quit, it can be very easy to simply label yourself as a hardgainer and to start making excuses. But the truth is that you’re not a hardgainer. That’s right….you heard me.. you’re not. Sure everyone’s biology and physiology is different, and sure you may have a slightly tougher time building muscle than others, but most of what you believe about being a hardgainer is just a myth that’s keeping you skinny. In reality, if you just do the 7 things that I”m about to show you consistently, I don’t care how much of a hardgainer you think you are, you’re going to bulk up. The first and most common problem for skinny guys is not eating enough calories. The irony is that Most people that call themselves hardgainers think that they eat so much, but thats usually not the case. On top of that there are some people out there passing along misinformation claiming that you don’t need a calorie Surplus to build muscle that it’s a myth and that you just need to be doing the right thin..

Research:

1. “consumption of amino acids, in particular leucine, stimulating increased muscle protein synthesis via the mTOR signaling pathway”
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3514292/

2. “long-term severe CR reduces serum total and free testosterone”
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20096034
“Restricting calories increased the total output of cortisol”
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20368473

3. Extreme calorie surpluses provide no muscle-building benefit but do cause fat gain. See figure 1 of the study
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23679146

4. Bench press strength associated with chest size:
See figure 1
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24169471

5. “more successful powerlifters typically have higher degrees of muscle mass expressed per unit height and/or bone mass”
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25611080
“the significant differences were for muscle mass and muscular girths, it would appear likely that these differences contributed to the stronger lifters’ superior performance.”
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17786689
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19826300

6. Ideal protein intake is 1.6g/kg or about 0.8g/lb
See Figure 5
https://bjsm.bmj.com/content/52/6/376

7. “greater protein intakes and a more even distribution across meals are modifiable factors associated with higher muscle mass”
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27465379
“an even distribution of daily protein intake across meals is independently associated with greater muscle strength”
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28515070

8. “a balanced distribution of daily protein intake” “acutely stimulated the synthesis of muscle contractile proteins more effectively than a skewed distribution”
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4420900/

9. Concurrent training: The negative effect that cardio has on lower body strength/muscle mass
See Figure 1
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22002517

10. “resulting in an increase in AMPK activity after endurance exercise” & “AMPK”… “leads to the inactivation of mTOR and a decrease in the rate of protein synthesis”
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17095927

(10.5) 2% Carbs vs 77% carbs effect on Muscles
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15879168

(11) Testosterone to Cortisol Ratio 60% carbs vs 30% carbs
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20091182

(12) “The carbohydrate restriction program caused a significant reduction in the number of squat repetitions performed”
https://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:142963

(13) “Approximately 1 hr of SR on five nights a week led to less proportion of fat mass loss” “despite similar weight loss”
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29438540

(14) high-GI meal resulted in a significant shortening of SOL in healthy sleepers
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17284739

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